Programme for 2017

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Conference Objective

Building on the success of previous conferences, The Cambridge Conference 2017 will examine the drivers that face the world over the next decades and enable leaders to consider how national spatial data infrastructures and National Mapping and Geospatial Agencies (NMGA) will have to adapt to contribute fully to our changing societies.

Sunday 2 July

15.00–18.00: Arrival at Keble College, Oxford (check in and familiarisation)

18.30: Welcome reception at Oxford Natural History Museum

20.00: Dinner at Keble College, Oxford

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Monday 3 July

07.30: Breakfast

09.00: Session 1, Plenary – The Case for Change

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Topic

Description

Speaker

1. Day 1 Chair opening remarks Mr Nigel Clifford, CEO, Ordnance Survey
2. Ministerial address on the The Challenges we Face Looking out to 2030 and beyond at the changing world and the challenges governments will face in the coming decades. Reflect on globalisation, urbanisation and increasingly autonomous cities and climate change. Consider the role that trusted information will play in government decision making at all levels. Senior UK Minister
3. UN Sustainable Development Goals. Transforming our world Look out to 2030 and examine how the sustainable development goals are set to meet challenges of the future. Invited: Mr Stefan Schweinfest,
Director, United Nations Statistics Division, Headquarters of the United Nations
4. Urbanisation and Future Cities Looking out beyond 2030, examine how the roles of cities in societies will change with globalisation and urbanisation. Discuss what characterises a future or smart city to differentiate from cities of today. Consider the challenges in managing a future city and the criticality of trusted information and data, whether in a developed or developing nation. Invited: Mr Leo Johnson, Author and Sustainability Expert
5. The Inexorable Rise of the Machines Humans have long interfaced with humans. Consider the rise of ‘the digital machine’ and the future internet of things. Consider robotics, automated decision making and mobility and how machines will interface with each other, looking forward 10 years. What does this mean for society globally? In particular, what are the developing trends in machines using location data and digital mapping data? Invited: Professor Sir Mark Walport, Government Chief Scientific Advisor
6. Refreshment break
7. National Security and Resilience Looking out to 2030 consider what national security threats and hazards the World faces, the resilience and contingency measures necessary and how data, services and analytics should evolve to support national security. Professor John Louth, Director for Defence, Industries and Society, Royal United Services Institute
8. Environmental change, resilience and disaster response Looking out beyond 2030 examine what resilience means and what the key events that we need to prepare for are. Consider how the global community needs to prepare, respond and recover from these events including the need for timely trusted data. Consider the socio-economic and environmental impacts of climate change on small island developing states. TBC: Director, Department for International Development
From the perspective of case studies consider resilience challenges in the face of major disasters and climate change. Focus on the Caribbean. Invited: Mr Rohan Richards, Principal Director, Ministry of Water, Land, Environment & Climate Change, Jamaica
The needs of first responders – the enduring principles and the challenges to still solve over the next 10 years. Mr Alan Mills, MapAction
9. Thirst for Data Consider the rise of ‘the digital machine’ and the future internet of things. Consider their growing thirst for data, particularly location data and how machines will interface with each other. What needs to happen to make this achievable, particularly in terms of changing data requirements and standards. Mr Nick Chrissos, CISCO Create
10. Conference photograph: The traditional conference photograph of mapping leaders from around the World.
11. Lunch and Exhibition – Sponsors will have stands at the conference; delegates will be able to directly engage with sponsors during breaks.
12. Passive Collection – involuntary crowd-sourced data The ubiquitous use of and growing accuracy of position in technology leads to massive collection of data, particularly by large corporates and telecoms companies. This involuntary crowd-sourced data has real value in building understanding, analytics and decision making and helps to build a ‘4D map’ of the planet. Looking out at 2030 consider the types of involuntary crowd-sourced positional data collected and its utility across government and business, particularly in beneficially meeting the challenges of tomorrow. Ms Melissa McDonald, Yandex
13. Making Sense of Big Data The sheer volumes of data available to society increases exponentially, creating issues over access and trust. Consider how machine-learning will help make sense of this data over the next 15 years, using illustrations from across the globe, particularly looking at ‘location data’ and trust. Examine the move to ‘the cloud’ over the same period. Dr Phil Tetlow, CTO Data Ecosystems,
IBM Research Establishment
14. Open Data, innovation and the economy Highlights the benefits of wide access to data for government services, business and the citizen. Looking out at 2030 consider the challenges in achieving this, including the cost of trusted maintained data, IP and privacy. Also, consider the human barriers to achievement and how far business data should also be ‘opened up’. Sir Nigel Shadbolt
15. Building a national infrastructure for growth when choices are running out Nations all face the challenge of growing populations, urbanisation and digitisation. Consider how to create stable communities, jobs and economic growth whilst sustaining the environment, and how location and other data helps with decision making. Invited: CEO National Infrastructure Commission – Mr Philip Green
16. Case study – 3D geospatial data enables 5G telecoms Demonstration showing how static 3D and dynamic data are relevant to 5G telecommunications based on lessons learned in Bournemouth. Mr Dave Happy, Ordnance Survey
17. Afternoon refreshment break
18. Serving the citizen: Cross-Government integration eGovernment is not just technology, it is innovative thinking, policies, people, processes, standards and data. Consider how eGovernment requires cross-government data sharing and integration and ‘future-cast’ how this will develop further over the next 15 years. Discover innovative examples of this integration, particularly where ‘location’ plays a part, to demonstrate citizen benefits as well as improvements in government efficiencies and effectiveness. Ms Sarah Davidson, Government of Scotland’s DG Communities
19. Which new geospatial data, services and solutions do we believe that future government, industry and citizen customers will demand in 2030? Five independent views each focusing on a different theme from the day. 4-minute presentations:
– Moldova – what will land administration demand?
– Nigeria – what data and services will urban development demand?
– Dubai – what data and services will Smart Nations demand?
– Japan – what data and services will Resilience demand?
Invited: Moldova: Ms Angela Matcov;
Invited: Nigeria: Surveyor Mr Ebisintei Awudu;
Invited: Dubai: Ms Maryam Obaid Almeiri, Director, GIS at Dubai Municipality;
Invited: Mr Hiroshi Murakami, Director-General of Geospatial Information Authority of Japan
Invited: Canada: Mr Prashant Shukle
20. Chairs closing remarks

17.30: Day one close

19.00: Informal event at the renowned Bodleian Library, Oxford, including an opportunity to view its historical map collection

20.30: Dinner at Keble College, Oxford

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Tuesday 4 July

07.30: Breakfast

09.00: Session 2 Plenary – Future geospatial tools, techniques and processes.

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Topic

Content

Speaker

21. Chair’s opening remarks TBC
22. Opening keynote: Looking out to the future – how geospatial technologies will change the way we think, plan and do Looking out to 2030 gain a ‘disrupting’ view of the conventional geospatial industry and learn how technology will challenge the conventional provision of geospatial data and services. Consider where this also impacts low-income nations. Offer views on how national mapping agencies can adapt to this and remain relevant. Mr Charles Davies, Chief Technology Officer, TomTom
23. The increasing choice in data collection to mapping agencies There has been a massive increase in collection technologies over recent decades. Consider what is yet to come in air, land, water and space. Discover how these can be used by the geospatial and mapping community, including for automated mapping data maintenance. Specific focus on photogrammetry, 3d modelling and point clouds. Professor Jon Mills, Newcastle University
24. The Willing Volunteer – Incorporating voluntary data into national databases At present few mapping databases contain crowd sourced or voluntary data. Consider how, in the future, this will be a valuable source of data for national geospatial, cadastral and mapping agencies Professor Muki Haklay,
Professor of Geographical Information Science,
Pearson Building
University College London
25. The value of Unified Addressing in a Smart census Nations conduct census every 10 years but there is a drive towards reducing costs and increasing currency of data. Examine how census will change over the next 15 years, the geospatial aspects necessary to make that happen and the value of location in understanding statisctics Ms Deidre Bishop, US Census Bureau
26. Improving Effectiveness – Automation and machine learning Looking out to 2030 consider the wider trends towards automation and machine learning. Consider in particular the ability to automate geospatial and cadastre data collection and maintenance, using technologies such as feature extraction and generalisation, machine cartography Invited: Mr Kenji Takeda, Microsoft Research
27. Brief on Wednesday workshops Conference team
28. Refreshment break
29. Autonomous Vehicles as a case study Autonomous vehicles bring together many aspects of the 2030 geospatial world. Machine to machine, need for precise highly maintained data, big data collection. Consider how ‘national mapping’ will change to support the automated world. Will mapping agencies face social and legal consequences for data errors? Professor Paul Newman,
Professor of Information Engineering, Robotics Research Group, Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University
30. Geospatial standards enabling the rise of machines The increasingly automated ‘machine to machine’ world of 2030 heralds an age of “machine cartography”, the ability to design data to open standards for machine to machine transactions. Discover the impact that this will have on geospatial standards in the future? Mr Mark Reichardt or Denise Mckenzie, Open Geospatial Consortium
31. Industry Panel Discussion: How will developing technology impact on geospatial data collection, and maintenance? Sponsors will have stands at the Conference; delegates will be able to directly engage with sponsors during breaks.
32. Lunch and exhibition
33. Serving the Citizen in a Virtual State As we move further into the 21st century, we witness an increasing need to understand, plan and operate in the 3rd and 4th dimension. Consider how 3D mapping and modelling in Singapore will unlock value for the government to provide better services to the citizens and support our people to make informed decisions in their daily lives. Discover what this virtual world will look in 10 years and the challenges faced in achieving this. If any ‘4th dimension’ services are being planned please also cover these, along with 3D Cadastre Mr Boon Khai Tan, Chief Executive, Singapore Land Authority
34. The planet moving below our feet: GNSS – automation and its impact on geodetic frameworks The increasing need for accuracy and precision in the world of 2030 has implications as the world’s surface continues to move, either gradually or violently, beneath our feet. National mapping agencies often maintain national geodetic and CORS networks – what needs to change? Mr Stuart Minchin, Chief of Environmental Geoscience Division, Geoscience Australia
35. Reacting to Change – the mapping agency platform of the future Based on emerging user needs and technologies, consider how a the ‘data-core’ of a mapping agency will need to adapt to survive. Not just from a technical perspective but also processes, organisations, quality and skills. Mr Neil Ackroyd, COO Ordnance Survey
36. Geospatial Managed Services: Serving and consuming geospatial data – future trends and Generating revenues from data and services What drives the need for a managed service – why New Zealand opted for that route and the benefits it is expected to bring – from operational to financial. Mr Andrew Crisp, Chief Executive, Land Information New Zealand
37. Afternoon refreshment break
38. Sustainable Land Administration – Case Study Land administration remains the greatest geospatial driver in many parts of the world. Look at how Rwanda has implemented a successful land administration programme and learn the lessons that give pointers to improved systems in the future. Invited: Director General, Rwanda Natural Resources Authority & Registrar of Land Titles
39. How will industry support future NMGAs deliver data and services? Sponsors will have stands at the Conference; delegates will be able to directly engage with sponsors during breaks.
40. Chair’s closing remarks

17.30: Day two close

19.00: Hotine Lecture, Keble College, Oxford – Mr Nick Middleton.

Nick Middleton is an award-winning geographer, writer, TV presenter, environmental scientist and university lecturer. His curiosity about how planet Earth works and how people interact with it was fuelled from an early age by his family’s world atlas, Hergé’s Adventures of Tintin and an endless flow of Willard Price novels. Now he works and communicates on a wide variety of environmental issues and travel topics for a broad range of audiences, from government policy-makers to primary-school children. He also teaches at the University of Oxford where he is a Fellow of St Anne’s College.

Nick is the author of seven travel books, including the bestseller, Going to Extremes, which accompanied a television series he wrote and presented for British TV and the National Geographic Channel on extreme environments and the people who live in them. His TV documentaries have been broadcast all over the world and his books translated into more than a dozen languages.

20.00: Dinner at Keble College, Oxford

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Wednesday 5 July

07.30: Breakfast

09.00: Future NMA: Shaping our contribution to future society

Session 3 – Morning breakouts: A set of break-out workshops to discuss challenges and make observations based upon the context set over preceding two days.

Five related topics each with a Chair, Deputy Chair, appropriate OS executive and an OS rapporteur. NMA Chairs to introduce and develop discussion, and report back key points to plenary.

09.0009.20: Plenary introduction by Chairman. Invited: Mr Prashant Shukle, Director General Mapping Information Branch, Natural Resources Canada
09.3009.45: Joint Chairs – introductory remarks
09.4510.30: Session 1 – short presentations and questions/discussions
10.3011.15: Coffee
11.1512.15: Session 2 – drawing out the key points
12.2013.00: Feedback from 7 workshops; 5 minutes per Chair/rapporteur

This day will focus on several interactive sessions considering the relevance and role of the NMA, the services expected by Smart nations and the role and delivery of Geospatial data to governments.

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Break-out session

Potential supplementary questions to address

41. Stream 1: Consider and determine the relevance, roles and outputs of the future NMGA in a digital economy -Will global businesses look to individual NMGAs or to trusted global geospatial data providers?
-Who are the new and key customers for a NMGA in 2027?
-How will NMGAs keep up?
42. Stream 2: Consider the relevance, roles and outputs of the future NMGA in achieving sustainable development -Does the NMGA have a greater role in national development than providing data and associated services? What is this?
-What part will earth observation play in delivering the value added NMGA outputs?
43. Stream 3: Consider the key areas of transformation on the road ahead for NMGAs and the obstacles to change -How will governments view the nation’s NMGA?
-How could funding and business models change?
-Can we adapt our management and what skills will we need?
44. Stream 4: What will be the relevance and benefit of a NSDI in 2027? -Will NSDIs exist or be part of a wider Government Data Infrastructure? In the context of paradigm shifts, automated processing.
45. Stream 5: Feeding the Geospatial Needs of a City in 2027 – what needs to change? -What characterises a future city and how does ‘Smart’ add to this?
-What is the information gap?
-Will cities create and maintain their own geospatial data?
-How will city geospatial data be managed?
-What are the barriers?

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Topic

Key content

Speaker

46. Plenary feedback Each workshop feeds back its key findings, including areas where there is no clear uniformity of opinion.
47. Chair’s closing remarks Mr Prashant Shukle

Session 4: Afternoon Closing Plenary (14.00-16.00). Five renowned international leaders give their views, adjusting thoughts based on discussion during the morning.

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Topic

Description

Speaker

48. Chair opening remarks Invited: Prashant Shukle , Director General Mapping Information Branch, Natural Resources Canada
49. Mapping India – 250 years on, the next decade As Survey of India celebrates 250 years, reflecting on the changes in mapping and how the Survey of India has moved with the times. Consider the fundamentals and the trends over this period and predict out to the ‘Survey of India’ in 2030. Invited: Surveyor General of India
50. Trusting data in a fit for purpose world The term authorised geospatial data is commonly used to help ‘defend’ the singular authority of a NMGA. The World is less simple as data sources increase; data needs to be trusted for the use to which it will be put. Based upon mapping and cadastral experience consider what authoritative and trusted data are and how we can assure trust in ‘fit for purpose’ geospatial and cadastral data in 2030. Mrs Dorinje Burmanje, Executive Board Chairman, Cadastre and Land Registry Agency and Mapping Agency
51. A leap of faith. How do smaller and developing nations gain the geospatial edge? The conference will have demonstrated a complexity and need for a potentially unaffordable financial burden on many nations. Looking out to 2030, consider how NMGAs across the world can all develop to meet national demands. Include reflection on fundamental data sets and what fit for purpose’ means in a geospatial data and collection / maintenance sense. How can NMGAs be sustainable by 2030. Mr Rolando Ocampo-Alcántar, Vice President National Institute of Statistics and Geography (INEGI)
52. Data Underpinning Smart Cities Cities in 2030 will be increasingly ‘smart’. Consider what this means for national and city geospatial policies and the output, design and operations of geospatial enablement at national and municipal levels Dr Li Pengde, Deputy Director General, National Administration of Surveying, Mapping and Geoinformation of China
53. Guest Speaker: Feeding the Demand – Is there a Professional Gap? How do we train, professionally develop and accredit sufficient land and geospatial professionals for the future. Is there a case for broadening accreditation across a wider range of disciplines and how do we cope with the convergence and divergence in related disciplines? Consider also managers who must manage this complex change. Invited: Ms Diane Dumashie, Vice Chair FIG
54. Chair’s conference closure
55. Afternoon refreshments

17.30: Day three close

19.30: Reception at Balliol College, Oxford

20.00: Gala Dinner at Balliol College, founded in 1263, Balliol is the oldest college in the English-speaking world. Note: formal or national dress.

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Thursday 6 July

Visit to Ordnance Survey, Southampton

Transforming a NMA – the GB Example

Ordnance Survey is facing many of the same demands, financial, technical, policy and innovation challenges that are being felt by national mapping and geospatial agencies across the World. Here, in 2017, it is in the middle of another major transformation and is delighted to share its transformation learnings internationally, as well as give visitors the chance to engage with related UK organisations not invited to the Cambridge Conference.

07.30: Breakfast

08.45: Depart for visit to Ordnance Survey Head Office in Southampton

10.00: Arrival at Explorer House, Southampton

10.15: Exhibition and workshops on the theme of Great Britain’s geospatial transformation considering the role of open data, public task and unprofitable mapping. We will be joined by a range of other UK government departments with an interest in geospatial as well as specialists on 5G rollout, Smart Cities and paper map production to provide an insight into the changes implemented across the UK to place geospatial data at the centre.

14.45: Depart Southampton for Southampton Airport, London Gatwick Airport, London Heathrow Airport or Central London (on request)

Activity

Description

Arrival and Coffee in Exhibition Area Arrive on coaches from Oxford at 10am
Welcome Ordnance Survey’s place in the Nation
OS Transformation – Why? The social, policy, technology, and financial drivers for transforming OS.
Making the Case The 2016 General Review set the framework for Ordnance Survey through its transformation. Learn about OS’s case to Government during the Review.
The Public Task OS has a national ‘public task’ role, driven by both the ‘open data’ and ‘unprofitable mapping’ perspectives – we explain how this works and how it is changing.
Commercial Customers The changing commercial customer – new requirements, new solutions and new means to monetise our assets.
OS Transformation – What and How? Looking at the transformation of OS across all its aspects and the end goals.
Smarter data, apps and services Transforming our products and services to meet greater customer demands and the reducing price of trusted data.
Lunch and Exhibition
Managing Data After OS’s ground breaking move into the data environment, we will describe how we are replacing our ‘factory’ with new concepts, technologies and processes and in so doing embracing the cloud.
Collection in UK OS considers many collection techniques but only employs them after rigorous assessment and testing. Learn about current and forthcoming developments in OS data collection.
Research and Innovation – the Road to Future Success Staying Ahead – OS Research, Development and Innovation.
Depart 14.45 – Coaches to Southampton Parkway Railway Station, airports and London

Frequently asked questions about the event

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